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Archive for July, 2008

BOOMER BABES by Maria Grazia Swan

Boomer Babes: True Tales of Love and Lust in the Later Years
by Maria Swan
Leisure

Looking for some outrageous inspiration to kick start your love life? Or some sizzlingly salacious gossip about the woman who could be your next-door neighbor?

It’s no surprise that the generation who burned bras and brought about The Summer of Love continues to redefine the way the world thinks about sex. Long-term lovers or one-night stands, there’s nothing these women haven’t tried. And now they dish on some of their dirtiest secrets.

Chock full of revolutionary real-life stories, tantalizing celebrity trivia and Cosmo-esque quizzes, Boomer Babes‘ wisdom can be put to use by women of any age.

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STOP MAKING MUSIC by Tom Samuels

Stop Making Music
by Tom Samuels
Satire/Humor
ArtBookBinery

Tom Samuels’ book, Stop Making Music, contains 136 essays that deliver contrary opinions on the music business. They are written in the voice of an arrogant nitwit who wrestles with “evil” musicians, songwriters and producers. Read each essay carefully because you will be asked if you “agree” or “disagree.” No one goes unscathed…not even the beloved Beatles. Where else could you find an Off-Broadway play based on the life of KoRn? You will be required to actually think about the current state of the music industry. Reading this book is an illuminating journey that will help you to understand why you are a music fan. There is a lesson to be learned in each chapter…a satirical, funny lesson that you will never forget.

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MARIPOSA by Candis C. Coffee

Mariposa
Literary Fiction
Behler Publications

A spiritual, intellectual, brave young woman creates the life of her dreams, only to be deeply disappointed by its inability to sustain her.

The setting of Mariposa is 1920s and 1930s West Texas, Los Angeles, and Mexico. The theme is that of a spiritual quest – a young woman’s desire to feel the magic she believes exists in connections to nature, to people. Deep down, she feels that fulfillment of spiritual longing, the ultimate mystical experience, is found within a connection to the “other.” The other for Annarose – an Anglo woman from rural 1920s Texas – is a Mexican man. Along the way, the story illuminates the perils of prejudice as well as the intimate, yet treacherous bond that exists between Anglo and Mexican people who live side by side near the border.

As a child in West Texas, Annarose sees life and intelligence in everything. She finds herself in a relationship with an invisible “Presence,” which beckons to her spirit and with whom she feels most alive. A friendship with a Mexican boy and her love of the landscape also nurture this young girl who feels rejected by her Mother.

Annarose is deeply hurt when she is banished to Los Angeles at thirteen. She loses her connection to spirit, then begins to seek it again through intellectual pursuits. Here she finds herself in a waiting room between worlds, that of Texas and Mexico.

Her philosophical studies and supportive friendship with Estelle, a gifted musician, lead to an awakening for Annarose. She becomes a writer, and she travels to Mexico. She wants to feel life again. She meets Mexican muralist, Crisanto and chooses him as her lover. He is her connection to all that is beautiful, wild, free and happy because he is the “Other” and she feels that she can also find aspects of the maternal within him. She befriends the artist, Frida Kahlo. She embraces all that this man, his people and his country represent.

In the end, Annarose returns to West Texas alone, ready to give birth to their child. Over a period of three days, the “Now” of the story, she spends time with her family, and she recalls her experiences. She finds peace, and she finally comprehends the true nature of joy.

This is first person literary fiction – an experience of self-discovery for educated women, particularly ethnic minorities between the ages of 16 and 60. The book contains about 87,000 words.

Mariposa is divided into three stages of Annarose’s life. The first is her youth in 1923 West Texas. Here I tell the story of Annarose’s childhood, her relationship with the Presence, her family, and her friend, Ismael. I introduce a young girl in love with mystery. The second section is 1930s Los Angeles. In this part I write about Annarose’s life in LA, her inspiring friendship with Estelle, and her new spiritual quest, which now involves reading and thinking rather than direct experience. The third stage is 1930s Mexico, the story of Annarose’s connection with magic, her love affair with Mexican muralist, Crisanto, friendship with Frida Kahlo, and the understanding of her true motivations for being in Mexico, with these people. She acknowledges her need to find connection to Spirit and magic outside herself.

The idea is to bring to light passages in Annarose’s life, with the most important occurring at the age of 13, then again thirteen years later. At the beginning of the story we meet the adult Annarose, who at 26 must decide what to do with herself, now that she has begun to see that, though her quest and objectives were honorable, the path she chose toward them was misguided. We then meet the child Annarose at the age of 13. This is a significant period, due to her spiritual life, her feelings for her friend, Ismael, and her eventual exile to Los Angeles. I divided the story into 13 chapters, with the idea that each would describe meaningful events or themes in her life. I chose the title Mariposa because the story is about transformation.

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ORGANIC FOR HEALTH by Sandy Powers

Organic for Health
Health
iUniverse

I call them The Big Offenders. These are the guys that add hormones and antibiotics to dairy cows, beef cattle, sheep, and chickens. They inject these hormones into cattle and sheep so the animals gain weight faster. The faster weight gain reduces the waiting time for the animal’s slaughter, speeding the meat to your dinner table.

Dairy cows are injected with hormones to increase milk production. This increase in milk production requires frequent milking, which in turn leads to udder infections that require antibiotics. Since the infections don’t always completely clear up, the government permits a certain amount of pus to remain in the milk.

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THE QUESTORY OF ROOT KARBUNKULUS

The Questory of Root Karbunkulus
Teen Fantasy
BookSurge

Young Root Karbunkulus gets an invitation to participate in ‘the coolest scavenger hunt of all time!’ Finally, her chance! She can escape the Aunts and prove once and for all there’s no stinkin’ “L” on her forehead! So what if she’s up against hundreds of other kids. It can’t be worse than murder ball. The rules say teams of three. Okay, okay her appointed team mates, Lian and Dwyn are screws-in-the-temples annoying…but livable…and really no worse than Goatface Kor or Hilly Punyun who, forget the panties, has a tiara for each day of the week. More rules: Can’t use magic on competitors. Doh! Oh well, at this point her magic is of the non-existent variety anyhow so…next! The first item up for grabs is the Miist of Kalliope, apparently some dead magician’s elixir. No prob. But wait. Out of hundreds of teams, there are only six of these Miists to be found? Leaving only six teams left to go after the next item? Then five, four, three, two…woah…this could get ugly….hmmm…compete and win…or go back to exfoliating those hard, crusted entities called Auntie Octavia’s feet?

Root Karbunkulus accepts the invitation. It will be a race of many, many hated things. But it will also be a contest of courage, friendship and the rising of soul. Within it Root will learn the terrifying truth behind the mysterious items. She will also discover, to her horror that she is not a player in an innocent kid’s race but a pawn in a vicious adult game that will readily send its champion into the profiteering hands of the enemy.

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